Rose hoping to top world rankings at Turkish Airlines Open

3 weeks ago

British golfer Justin Rose has admitted that he is aiming to return to the top of the world rankings, ahead of the upcoming Turkish Airlines Open in Antayla. The 38-year-old claimed a hard fought victory at the event last year, carding an impressive -18 to see off nearest competitors Nicolas Colsaerts and Dylan Frittelli. Rose now has another chance to successfully defend a title for the first time in his career, after falling short at the WGC-HSBC last month.

Justin Rose ended his 2017 season with a dramatic charge for the Race to Dubai crown, winning both the WGC-HSBC Championship and Turkish Airlines Open. The 38-year-old currently sits almost 2,500,000 points behind European leader Francecso Molinari on this year’s leaderboard, effectively ruling him out of the race for this year’s title; however, victory at this week’s tournament in Antayla ,could see Rose recapture the World No.1 spot, ahead of Brooks Koepka and Dustin Johnson.

“It would be a great double-whammy,” said Rose “I set many goals between now and the end of the year.

“Last week I had the opportunity to defend and in Indonesia I have the opportunity to defend, as well as here. I haven’t been able to do that many times in my career and that was a goal, certainly for that collective three events.

“But I said a while back, that I wanted to get to world No 1 by winning golf tournaments, and I got there by finishing second at the BMW a month or so ago. This would be a great place to knock off two big goals of mine, which is to get back to world No 1. Once you get a taste for it, it’s quite nice, and to defend a title would be a special feeling, too.”

Rose came dangerously close to defending his WGC-HSBC Championship title last week, finishing four shots behind Xander Schauffele and Tony Finau, with Finau eventually winning the tournament via a playoff. The result marked Rose’s best finish since September’s BMW Championship, where he finished second behind American Keegan Bradley.

“If I look back to a couple of years ago, my team and I put a plan together for what we felt I had to do to get to world No 1, and a big part of that was my putting. But it’s not about just improving your putting, it’s how you go about that.” he added. “We built a bit of a process. I felt I could really improve between three and eight feet, so I built some putting drills to help me improve that. And then this year, on the PGA Tour anyway, where the stats are quite robust and you can look into it a bit deeper, I was No 1 from four-to-eight feet on Tour.”

“So that’s how I choose to set my goals, really, is areas of my game rather than results. I feel like the results take care of themselves from that point of view.”